MOzen: Dim Sum 101

“Dim Sum at MOzen is extremely popular. Everything is made fresh and served at the table in bamboo steamer baskets. All the portions are extremely generous. The items are great as appetizers or snacks, both in the restaurant and for in-room dining.”
—Robert Jenny, Food and Beverage Manager

Like most fare, dim sum isn’t just a food—it’s a culture. Originating in southern China as a snack to accompany tea, dim sum means “a touch of your heart,” implying it’s a light meal. Today it is a staple on many Chinese menus.
The original small-plates cuisine, similar to French hors d’oeuvres or Spanish tapas, dim sum consists of a series of hot or cold dishes that are fried, steamed, baked or stir-fried, and served on small dishes or bamboo steamers. Here are some standard dim sum items.

GAO OR DUMPLINGS
Different ingredients—shrimp, pork, mushrooms, meat, cabbage, peanuts—wrapped in a translucent rice flour or wheat starch skin, and then pan-fried, steamed, or both.

BAO
Baked or steamed, these wheat flour buns are fluffy and filled with ingredients that range from meats, seafood, and vegetables to sweet bean pastes.

ROLLS
Vegetables and sometimes meat rolled inside a thin flour skin, wide rice noodles, or tofu skins, and then fried or steamed.

CHAR SIEW SOU
A dried, flaky Chinese pastry filled with barbecued pork that has been seasoned with honey, five-spice powder, and fermented bean curd, among other ingredients.

POPIAH CHEE
Fried spring rolls stuffed with shredded jicama, carrots, shrimp, or pork fillings. Served with a chili sauce.

STEAMED GLUTINOUS RICE
Steaming sticky rice flavored with chicken, mushrooms, sausage, or scallions wrapped in a lotus leaf.

YEAR OF THE SHEEP
February 19, 2015, marks the beginning of the Year of the Sheep. Gentle and calm, sheep are well liked. People born under this sign are tender, polite, clever, and kindhearted. They are also sensitive to art, faith, and quiet living, and share their birth year sign with Michelangelo, Mark Twain, Thomas Edison, Muhammad Ali, and a few Chinese emperors!

To celebrate this fortuitous holiday, each year the Mandarin Oriental Las Vegas creates a special dim sum menu that features a prosperity platter along with a selection of items created specifically to mark the occasion.

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